Monitoring in Support of Local, National and International Environmental Priorities

Bina Hill students addressing commuity problems with our project at Bina Hill 2 workshop
Community discussion of potential problems of environmental monitoring by villagers (photo Jose Fragoso)

Jose Fragoso lectures at Stanford’s Center for Latin American Studies (link: http://events.stanford.edu/events/482/48261/) on what leads to success and failure in environmental and social monitoring by local people.

You can view a video recording of the lecture here: https://vimeo.com/117443887

The lecture is highly recommended for academics, researchers, professionals and students interested in the success and failure of participatory and citizen science monitoring approaches


“A fine line: new computer program predicts when human impact becomes too much”

Village by an Amazonian river (photo by Jose Fragoso)

We have completed a major work describing the sustainability of hunting, farming (land use) and local livelihoods in the tropics. We devised an agent based computer simulation model and explored the relationships between the above mentioned elements to consider what the future may hold for tropical forest biota, ecosystems and peoples.

Stanford University, Mongabay and others published news reports about the work. You can view two here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/june/amazon-sustainability-model-061314.html

and  http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0703-morgan-indigenous-model.html

Article:

Iwamura T., Lambin E., Silvius K.M., Luzar J.B. & Fragoso J.M.V. 2014. Agent-based modeling of hunting and subsistence agriculture on indigenous lands: understanding interactions between social and ecological systems. Environmental Modelling & Software, 58: 109-127.

View full article: Continue reading ““A fine line: new computer program predicts when human impact becomes too much””

Customized Atlases of the Rupununi, Amazon

Wowetta_Atlas_final (dragged)Jane Read from Syracuse University and the Fragoso lab (Project Fauna) produced atlases for 23 villages of the Rupununi, Guyana. Each atlas provides a socio-economic and environmental profile of the village.

Atlases for Fairview, Wowetta, Paipong / Tiger Pond, Katoka, Kwaimatta, Tipuru, Aishalton, Achawib, Para Bara, Karaudarnau and Awarewanau can be downloaded from the North Rupununi District Development Board at: http://www.nrddb.org/projectfaunaaltlases

The US National Public Radio’s The World program reported on our return of the atlases to communities. The reporter, Elsa Yougstead actually traveled for two weeks with us through the villages.  You can hear the report here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2011-08-25/slideshow-customized-atlases-amazon


“Assessing Carbon Stock Value of Forests is Tricky Business”

Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation
Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation (photo by Han Overman)

Mongabay’s Sanhya Sekar  wrote two articles concerning the Fragoso Group’s work with indigenous people’s field measurements of tropical forest carbon stocks.  Sekar writes  “With financial incentives encouraging maintenance of carbon stocks and the increased popularity of carbon trading between countries, a forest has become economically a lot more than a clump of trees that supplements livelihoods. A forest now has an intrinsic value by just existing, a value that can be measured in economic terms.”

The Mongabay articles can be seen here: http://news.mongabay.com/2015/02/assessing-carbon-stock-value-of-forests-is-tricky-business-study-finds/

CITATION: Butt, N., Epps, K., Overman, H., Iwamura, T., & Fragoso, J. M.V. (2015). Assessing carbon stocks using indigenous peoples’ field measurements in Amazonian Guyana. Forest Ecology and Management, 338, 191-199.

View complete article: Continue reading ““Assessing Carbon Stock Value of Forests is Tricky Business””

Into the Amazon

Kirsten Silvius’s, research (with our lab) highlighted on Virginia Tech University’s home page ((http://www.vt.edu/) with photos by Jose Fragoso. The article describes how economists, fisheries biologists and wildlife managers are working together to set resource use policies in the Amazon. Story: “Virginia Tech Scientists work to Save the Amazon Rainforest and its Biodiversity” (http://www.vt.edu/spotlight/achievement/2015-08-17-amazon/cnre.html)
Kirsten Silvius & L. Flamarion de Oliviera (photo Jose Fragoso)

Kirsten Silvius’s, research (with our lab) highlighted on Virginia Tech University’s home page (http://www.vt.edu/) with photos by Jose Fragoso. The article describes how economists, fisheries biologists and wildlife managers are working together to set resource use policies in the Amazon.

Full Story:  (http://www.vt.edu/spotlight/achievement/2015-08-17-amazon/cnre.html)


Jose Fragoso on National Public Radio

Jose Fragoso was interviewed by National Public Radio (NPR-USA) in Hawaii concerning The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation’s (ATBC) call for the US government to continue funding Kahoolawe, Hawaii’s biocultural restoration. The island was used by the US military for over 50 years for training exercises and as a bombing range.  The island is very important to Native Hawaiians.

You can hear the interview here: http://hpr2.org/post/conversation-thursday-july-16th-2015#stream/0

ATBC Hawaii Declaration:  http://tropicalbiology.org/atbc-2015-honolulu-declaration/


Scientists call on government to fund Kahoolawe, Hawaii restoration

The Maui News, Big Island Chronicle San Francisco SFGATE and Star Advertiser newspapers all carried stories citing The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation’s (ATBC) call for the US government to fund the biocultural restoration of Hawaii’s Kahoolawe Island.  In the articles ATBC’s representative Jose Fragoso calls for the US government to complete their agreement for cleaning up the island.  It was used for over 50 years for military exercises and as a bombing range.

You can view the articles here:

The Maui News:
Scientists call on government to fund Kahoolawe restoration
http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/600078/Scientists-call-on-government-to-fund-Kahoolawe-restoration.html

Big Island Chronicle:
Biologists to US: Keep your Word on Kho’olawe
http://www.bigislandchronicle.com/tag/association-of-tropical-biology-and-conservation/

The Star Advertiser:
Juy 17, 2015
http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20150717_Scientists_call_for_government_to_fund_K        ahoolawe_restoration.html?id=316136061

SFGATE (San Francisco):
Scientists call for government to fund Kahoolawe restoration
http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Scientists-call-for-government-to-fund-Kahoolawe-6391074.php


We have a new publication out: Shamanism, Christianity and Culture Change in Amazonia

This publication looks at how different Christian religions influence indigenous people’s belief systems concerning hunting and meat taboos in the Amazon

Luzar J.B, and Fragoso JMV. 2012. Shamanism, Christianity and Culture Change in Amazonia. Human Ecology 41:299-311.

View complete article: Continue reading “We have a new publication out: Shamanism, Christianity and Culture Change in Amazonia”